Saint Peter and Saint Paul Apostles, Year A, 28th June 2020 (UK)

‘Who do you say I am?’

Following Eastertide and several major feasts, we now celebrate Saints Peter and Paul before returning to the regular Sundays of Ordinary Time. We pray that their faith and example will encourage us at this time.

The First Reading gives us an account of how Peter escaped prison while the Christian community prayed continuously for him.

The Psalm is a song of praise and thankfulness for the psalmist’s own delivery, as he encourages us to ‘taste and see that the Lord is good.’

St Paul, too, in the Second Reading, is full of gratitude. He praises the Lord for rescuing him and enabling him to continue proclaiming God’s message.

The Gospel narrates the important moment when Jesus asks his disciples, ‘Who do people say I am?’ Peter’s reply earns his designation as leader of the community.

May the faith of Peter and Paul and their dedication to spreading Jesus’s message encourage us this week in our daily living.

CLICK HERE FOR THE PREGO

CLICK HERE FOR THE PREGO PLUS

CLICK HERE FOR THE GOD WHO SPEAKS

The Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ (Corpus Christi), Year A, 14th June 2020

Christ is our Food and Drink

This Sunday the Roman Catholic church celebrates the feast of the Body and Blood of Christ, traditionally known by its Latin name ‘Corpus Christi’. It is an opportunity to reflect on the fact that Christ gave us his body and blood as spiritual sustenance.

The First Reading reminds us that God fed his people with manna and water as he brought them out of Egypt. Their faithful God did not abandon them.

The Psalm continues on the same theme. God provided the finest food, gave them peace, and through his word ensured that Israel could follow the right path.

In his letter to the Corinthians, St Paul reminds his audience of the intimate relationship between the bread and wine we partake in the Eucharist, and the body and blood of Christ. We are united through this one bread and form one body of Christians. (Second Reading)

In the Gospel, Jesus explains to the Jews that his body and blood will give them spiritual nourishment. This food is not the same as the food God gave Israel in the desert; what Jesus offers here is a way for us to be living in him and he in us.

By sharing his body and blood through the form of bread and wine in the Eucharist, there is an intimate relationship between ourselves and the Lord. This week, let us pray for all those who do not know this close union or who are not able to be part of it. We also remember all deprived of the Eucharist because of the pandemic.

CLICK HERE FOR THE PREGO

CLICK HERE FOR THE PREGO PLUS

CLICK HERE FOR THE GOD WHO SPEAKS

The Most Holy Trinity, Year A, 7th June 2020

‘The God of Love and Peace be with you!’

One God, three persons united in a constant flow of love and tenderness! On this feast of the Most Holy Trinity, we are all invited to be drawn deeper into the rhythm of this eternal dance of love.

Moses met God in the form of a cloud (First Reading). God revealed the foundational truth that underlies the commandments Moses was carrying: the Lord is compassion and tenderness, slow to anger and rich in kindness.

The Psalm from the Book of Daniel is an excerpt from a joyful song of praise, attributed to three men whose faith had saved them from a fiery furnace: ‘To you glory and praise for evermore’.

In Paul’s letter (Second Reading) we hear how the early Christian community were encouraged to embody this Trinitarian loving relationship, in how they lived and greeted one another. As we slowly start to emerge from the restrictions we have been living under, may we truly value and cherish our bonds of friendship.

In John’s Gospel, Jesus reveals to Nicodemus the depth of God’s love for all people. God sent his Son so that all may have eternal life.

Our Creator God became fully human and lived as one of us, physically living out the compassion and tenderness revealed to Moses centuries before. At Pentecost, the Spirit of God was poured into the hearts of Jesus’s followers. This same Spirit of love and kindness unites us now as we pray, whether we do so alone, with a group, or in a virtual gathering. May the Grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with us all.

CLICK HERE FOR THE PREGO

CLICK HERE FOR THE PREGO PLUS

CLICK HERE FOR THE GOD WHO SPEAKS

Pentecost Sunday, Year A, 31st May 2020

‘Peace be with you!’

Pentecost, seen as the birthday of the Christian Church, is the culmination of Eastertide. It is the day when we celebrate the gift of the Holy Spirit and the start of the Church’s mission to the world – a mission to bring people to God. We hear of this in the Gospel, when the risen Jesus comes to the disciples in the locked room bringing peace. He shows them his wounds, encouraging them to believe that he is indeed risen from the dead, and sends them out.

In the First Reading the disciples receive the gift of the Holy Spirit, bringing them courage and the ability to speak different languages. Now they can reach out to all nations, telling the peoples about God.

The Psalm praises God’s greatness, celebrating all the riches and goodness that the Spirit freely gives to ‘renew the face of the earth’.

The Second Reading speaks of the gifts that God’s Spirit gives to each one of us. Working together in different ways towards a common aim, Paul compares us to a human body – each part working towards the well-being of the whole.

As we celebrate Pentecost and the birthday of the Church, we might like to reflect on the particular role that God has for each one of us. This week, I might ponder the contribution that I myself can make to the mission of the Church, and to all those around me.

CLICK HERE FOR THE PREGO

CLICK HERE FOR THE PREGO PLUS

CLICK HERE FOR THE GOD WHO SPEAKS

The Presentation of the Lord, 2nd February 2020

My eyes have seen the light of salvation!

Forty days after Christmas, we observe the Presentation of the Lord in the Temple (the feast of Candlemas), when we celebrate Christ as the light of the world. In many places candles are blessed in church and carried in procession to welcome him. This day also marks the end of Christmastide, and the slow return of longer daylight hours.

Today’s First Reading is a prophecy in which we can recognise the Messiah. His coming will be a challenge, but also good news for those who welcome him.

We sing the Psalm as we follow the Lord, our King of glory.

Christ has come to live among us as one of us. Although he is God’s Son, he was tempted in every way that we are, and so is able to help us in our temptations (Second Reading).

The Gospel reminds us of the first time the Lord entered the Temple, with Mary and Joseph. There he meets Simeon, an old man who recognises Jesus as the long-awaited Messiah; together with Anna, a prophetess who tells everyone she meets about him.

As we read Simeon’s warning to Mary that her Son will be rejected, and that a sword will pierce her own soul, we might bring to mind and pray for all mothers, particularly those who witness and suffer the loss of their children, whether we know them personally or not.

CLICK HERE FOR THE PREGO

CLICK HERE FOR THE PREGO PLUS

CLICK HERE FOR THE GOD WHO SPEAKS

 

Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe, Year C, 24th November 2019

Jesus is the image of the unseen God

This Sunday brings the Church’s liturgical year to its conclusion. Today we celebrate our King whose wealth lies in his love for all, and whose authority is exercised through the service of those who are often considered the least in society.

Through his life and death, Jesus reveals the wondrous and challenging nature of his kingship. Luke’s Gospel, in particular, emphasises that God’s universal love and forgiveness are revealed in the person of Jesus Christ. Even in his dying moments, Jesus was more concerned with saving others than saving himself.  (Gospel)

The First Reading tells of the people of Israel anointing David as their king. The Lord asks him to be both shepherd and leader of his people.

The Psalm is a pilgrim song, sung on arrival to Jerusalem; the city to which David moved after his anointing as King at Hebron.

St Paul strongly asserts the primacy of Jesus Christ who is both the first-born of all creation and the first-born from the dead. Christ is the image of the invisible God, whose authority and power far exceeds that of any human king. There is no other force at work on earth that compares with him. (Second Reading)

This week, we might join with Pope Francis in praying to share the Church’s Universal Mission, that we and all Christians might strengthen and grow God’s mission through the Church by our own prayer and action.

CLICK HERE FOR THE PREGO

CLICK HERE FOR THE PREGO PLUS

Feast of Our Lord Jesus Christ, Universal King, Year B, 25th November 2018

‘Mine is not a kingdom of this world’

The last Sunday of the Church’s year is celebrated as the Feast of Jesus Christ, the Universal King.  We celebrate the resurrection victory of Jesus over suffering and death, a moment in historical time that has everlasting meaning, and look forward to the end of time when we will know fully the glory, holiness and peace of God’s kingdom.

The readings all bear witness to the glory of Christ Jesus.  The First Reading is a prophecy from Daniel that can be seen to foretell the coming of Jesus, when people of all nations and languages will become his faithful servants.

The Second Reading describes the love of Jesus for each one of us; a love that makes us not simply servants, but fills us with his glory even as we mourn his death.

We can trust all that Jesus has done and said; his majesty, power and holiness are unchanged to the end of time (Psalm).

The Gospel recounts the dialogue between Pilate and Jesus in the hours before the crucifixion. Jesus tells us that his kingdom has values that are not of this world.  If we seek the truth, we will listen carefully to his voice and live by his words.

This week, we pray that we may learn to know him more fully in our prayer and follow him more faithfully in our lives.

CLICK HERE FOR THE PREGO

CLICK HERE FOR THE PREGO PLUS

Birth of St John the Baptist, Year B, 24th June 2018

Testify to the light

John the Baptist is the only saint whose birthday is observed by the Church.  Today, in the Gospel, we celebrate that birth and the joy it brought. We also remember John’s identity and mission as he is named – just as God calls each one of us by name even before we are born, and invites us to respond to his call.

As a forerunner of the Lord, John was not given his father’s name, but that given by the angel – even before his birth he was chosen to be a bearer of light to the nations (First Reading).

The Psalm affirms that I, too, am chosen to go out testifying to the light.  I am moulded and fashioned for this purpose.

I can trust the Lord.  It is his promise and his work in me (Second Reading).  God will choose people after his own heart to bring the message of salvation to the ends of the earth.

Let us pray this coming week that we, too, might live according to the gift of salvation, asking the Lord for strength to be faithful to the name by which he has called us, as we try to spread light to others.

CLICK HERE FOR THE PREGO

CLICK HERE FOR THE PREGO PLUS

 

Want the Prego delivered direct to your Inbox each week? Here’s how!

 

Easter Sunday, Year B, 1st April 2018

ST BEUNO’S OUTREACH WISHES YOU A VERY HAPPY EASTER!

Rejoice!

I have journeyed with Jesus through Holy Week, in whatever way was possible for me. Now I come to share in the joy of my Risen Lord on this Easter Day.

The Gospel tells the story of Mary of Magdala, who goes to the tomb but finds it empty; she runs to the disciples to report her loss. Peter and John come to see for themselves. Finally they understand the meaning of Jesus’s words about ‘rising from the dead’.

Peter offers his personal witness: he has seen the life and death of Jesus, and eaten with him after his Resurrection. He now proclaims that Jesus is Saviour and Lord. (First Reading)

In the Second Reading, Paul stresses that this faith in the Risen Lord means we too have died and been brought back to true life in Christ. Our life is now ‘hidden with Christ in God’.

The Psalm is a song of triumph, proclaiming the glory of God. ‘The stone that the builders rejected has become the corner stone; this is the work of the Lord, a marvel in our eyes’.

CLICK HERE FOR THE PREGO

CLICK HERE FOR THE PREGO PLUS

 

Want the Prego delivered direct to your inbox each week? Here’s how!

 

The Baptism of Our Lord, Year B, 7th January 2018

‘Come, all you who are thirsty!’

The readings for this coming Sunday invite us to freedom: to open wide our minds and hearts to receive the God who chooses to reveal God’s own self to us; and who may surprise us in doing so!

God invites me to fulfil my thirst for all that is good.  I am called to receive the gift of life itself, freely given in Baptism, and asked to assume an attitude of trust and ‘not knowing’ before the God who says ‘my thoughts are not your thoughts, my ways are not your ways’ (First Reading).

The result is joy and gladness, as I begin to realise just how deeply I can trust the God who is ‘my strength, my song’, who ‘became my saviour’ (Psalm); the ‘God who is rich in forgiving’ (First Reading).

Having received the gift of being loved as a child of God, I am asked to love God and all God’s children in return.  I know that, through faith in Jesus Christ, I will be given the Holy Spirit’s help to overcome whatever difficulties I may experience (Second Reading).

John the Baptist speaks of Jesus with great reverence as ‘one who is more powerful than I am’, who will ‘baptise you with the Holy Spirit’.  Jesus receives John’s baptism, as Father, Son and Holy Spirit unite to reveal the truth of God made man for us (Gospel).

I pray that I may grow ever more deeply in trust and love of our God, who says to me too, ‘You are my Beloved’.

CLICK HERE FOR THE PREGO

CLICK HERE FOR THE PREGO PLUS